Beating The Postpartum Blues

Postpartum blues is a normal and very common mental health condition that occurs after giving birth. It only lasts temporarily for a short term, and it's effects are considered mild by professionals - it's simply a woman's natural reaction to sudden hormone changes and the huge, life-changing event of giving birth to a child. 

Despite all the the happy feelings of having a new child, mums will often feel upset and break down into tears when experiencing postpartum blues, and it's much more common than you may know! In fact, it's thought to affect about 70-80 percent of women, and another 25 percent of men experience the same kind of feelings, known as 'sad dads'.

But how exactly does it take form?

Women's hormones levels are about 20-30 percent higher during pregnancy, and the physical exertion of having a baby also creates a chemical high in the brain. After birth, hormone levels drop and this all creates a sort of 'come-down' feeling, which we know as postpartum blues. Lack of sleep, marital stress and even just the burden of being a first time parent can all have an impact on how you feel after giving birth too.

If you do happen to experience postpartum blues, the good news is that it shouldn't last long. The mood swings and sadness tends to peak after a week, and after two weeks you should be back to your normal self again.

It's very important to know and understand that there is a difference between postpartum blues and more serious waves of depression. If your symptoms develop further or continue for more than a couple of weeks, be sure to reach out to a professional and get some help. 

How can you beat the postpartum blues?

The best thing you can do to get yourself out of feeling down is to make sure that you eat well and drink plenty of water along with a little exercise and lots of rest. Sometimes, just knowing that it's not going to last can go a long way. Remember that being open and honest about your feelings is always beneficial and will help your friends and family understand what you're going through.